[Webinar] Implementing Women, Peace and Security: Localization in the OSCE Region

This webinar aims to present the results of the OSCE and LSE study Implementing Women, Peace and Security Agenda in the OSCE Region and will discuss how to further develop localisation of the implementation of the women, peace and security agenda and National Action Plans (NAPs).
Full details ▼

Event type: Online discussions

Start date: 1 July 2020 | Start time: 14:00 UTC02:00
End date: 1 July 2020 | End time: 15:30 UTC02:00

Location: Online

Event description

Register for the webinar ►

2020 marks the 20-year anniversary of the UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000). The anniversary provides a good momentum for examining how far have we progressed in implementing the UNSCR 1325 and the nine related resolutions. In October 2020, the UN Security Council will host high-level events to take stock of the implementation of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda. The theme for this year’s debate is, “Towards the successful implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda: Moving from the commitments to accomplishments in preparation for the commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325”.

In January 2020 the OSCE Secretariat Programme for Gender Issues and the London School of Economics (LSE) Centre for Women, Peace and Security jointly published the study Implementing Women, Peace and Security Agenda in the OSCE Region (available in English and Russian).[1] This study provides information on progress, trends as well as challenges in WPS implementation. It examines the national action plans (NAPs) of OSCE participating States, and offers more in-depth information on NAP implementation from five case study countries (Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Serbia and Ukraine).

This webinar aims to present the results of the study and will discuss one of the main findings of the WPS study and how to further develop localization of the implementation of women, peace and security agenda and NAPs. All five case countries in the study have explored ways to localize women, peace and security NAPs, and the study identifies six avenues of localization from development of local action plans to including locally implementable activities in NAPs or including WPS activities in local gender equality implementation plans. It still remains unclear, however, what impact these efforts to localize WPS NAPs have had, how a systematic approach can be followed in localization, and how sufficient funds can be secured and targeted for best results.

More information on the event and the speakers is available on the LSE website.


[1] This study has been prepared as a part of the OSCE Secretariat Programme for Gender Issues project OSCE Support to Women, Peace and Security. The project activities have been enabled by generous contributions from the following OSCE participating States: Finland, Italy, Norway, United Kingdom, and the United States of America.

Sponsored by: Europe and Central Asia Regional Office, OSCE Secretariat Programme for Gender Issues, LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security