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As the gender gap across science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) persists around the world and in Kosovo , more than 100 young women studying in STEM fields participated in a virtual event to mark the International Day of Women and Girls in Science. Organized by the UN Women office in Kosovo, in cooperation with the Office of the Presidency and the Ministry of Education, Science, Technology and Innovation, the event delivered the message that today’s girls can become tomorrow’s leading scientists and innovators, shaping a fair and sustainable future for all.
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Taking on the greatest challenges currently facing the global community will mean harnessing all talent. As the world continues to grapple with COVID-19 and the critically important climate crisis, the full and equal participation and leadership of women and girls in the science and technology communities is more important than ever.
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Dr. Aiymgul Kerimray is an environmentalist and a senior researcher at Al-Farabi Kazakh National University in Almaty, Kazakhstan. On the occasion of International Day of Women and Girls in Science, UN Women spoke to Kerimray about her research on energy poverty and air quality in urban areas and its gendered impacts.
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Katarina Ponjavić is a final-year student of Dental Medicine at the Faculty of Dentistry in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. This young aspiring surgeon invented a device for medical and infectious waste disposal that received international patent protection from the World Intellectual Property Organization in Geneva.
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Nino Enukidze, the rector of Business and Technology University, is 35 years old. With her direct participation, the university became a signatory to the UN Women’s Empowerment Principles in 2019, and to support the involvement of girls in technology, she launched the initiative “Coding School for Women”. With its support, more than 2,500 girls have been trained in technological professions, with 75 per cent of them employed in the industry.
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UN Women in Kazakhstan launched a new project to strengthen STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) skills of young women from East Kazakhstan and Kyzylorda regions with the support of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Kazakhstan.
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ITU, UN Women and EQUALS join forces to launch study on Women, Girls and ICT in the context of Covid-19 in selected European countries.
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On this International Day of Women and Girls in Science, UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka calls on everyone to harness the power of innovation and technology as drivers of change, and work together to empower all women and girls across the science fields. 
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In Albania, there are significant gaps in science, technology, engineering and math fields at graduate, postgraduate and doctorate levels. Girl students in Albania dominate the field of educational sciences, followed by health and welfare. However, they remain under-represented in STEM particularly because of social, cultural and gender norms.
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Her Royal Highness Dr. Nisreen El-Hashemite is an Iraqi princess who defied royal protocol and became a medical doctor and a geneticist. Popularly known as the “Science Princess,” she holds advanced degrees in biomedical science, molecular biology, and genetics. She has used her passion and experience as a prominent doctor and scientist to advocate for more women in science and medicine, and for empowering women and girls to follow those paths and fight for equal pay. She is the Executive Director of the non-governmental organization (NGO) Royal Academy of Science International Trust (RASIT), which is a partner of UN Women in Europe and Central Asia region.
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Gender stereotypes still dictate and limit women’s career choices In Moldova, as in many other countries. Now, thanks to GirlsGoIT, a UN Women initiative, a digital industry that once largely bypassed women in Moldova, is no longer a missed opportunity for them.
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As she mixes several chemical compounds in a test tube, she meticulously takes notes to make sure she is tracking each stage of the experiment. At this early stage in her research on silica nano-coating, each trial counts. At the age of 36, Asel Sartbaeva, one of the first internationally recognized female scientists from Central Asia, focuses on creating a way for vaccines to be transported without the expensive and challenging aspects of keeping them at lower temperatures.