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Unstereotype Alliance is an industry-led initiative convened by UN Women in 2017 to end the harmful gender stereotyping often perpetuated through communications.The Alliance is a “think and do” platform that uses communications as a force for good to drive positive change, focused on empowering people in all their diversity (gender identity, race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, age, ability, sexuality, language, religion, education, body-size and more).
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To map out media practices and assess the overall quality of reporting on violence against women and girls on social media, UN Women joined forces with the BeFem non-governmental organization (NGO) to conduct an analysis entitled, ‘Bad as usual, in unusual times’ with the support of Norwegian embassy in Belgrade.
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This report provides the results of the first youth-led regional campaign of UN Women, #YOUthdemand. Prepared by the national gender youth activists, the report highlights the demands of the youth across the region and summarise the #YOUthdemand Gender Equality session conducted at the Generation Equality Forum in Mexico following the social media campaign.
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In an effort to address the impacts of COVID-19, companies are developing a number of socially beneficial communications for the public. It is essential that these communications avoid harmful stereotypes and seek to depict positive and progressive gender portrayals.
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This handbook provides guidance for media organizations in Bosnia and Herzegovina for addresing violence against women issues in a responsible way on their news coverage.
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This is the first study that examines female inactivity in details, based on a large, representative sample of female citizens in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Data enable us to develop a profile of the “typical” inactive woman in the country, which can be then used to design policies to promote female activity, with particular emphasis on women whose inactivity is not their individual choice.
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This policy brief highlights the need for publicly provided social care services for children, the sick, the elderly and persons with disabilities to reduce the burden of unpaid care work on women and advance women’s economic empowerment. It details the substantial advantages and returns countries stand to gain in the short and long run from such investments.
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WEPs signatory companies are expected to consider their sector, corporate culture, and current situation, in terms of gender equality and impact areas, and develop a solution in line with their targets and necessities. This guide aims to support companies in creating a roadmap for developing solutions in accordance with WEPs. The guide explains the scope of the principles, as well as indicators used to monitor them, and suggests policies to be followed during implementation.
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This brief demonstrates that public investment in early childhood education would be key to creation of decent jobs in Turkey, especially for women. According to the brief, public investment in early childhood education is more effective in job creation than public investment in physical infrastructure.
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The report aims to show that the fiscal prioritization of Early Childhood Care and Preschool Education expansion, and hence the building of a social infrastructure of care, over, for instance, investments in physical infrastructure/construction or cash transfers, presents an enormous potential for decent job creation, particularly in the femaledominated occupations and sectors.
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Intended for gender experts, governments and the public, Pathway to Gender Equality uses practical materials and identifies strategic entry points and specific ways in which the MDGs, CEDAW and BPfa correspond and support each other. After a preliminary mapping of gender equlality issues raised by each MDG, the book provides the corresponding obligations and commitments under CEDAW and BPfA, and outlines how the MDGs can be used to implement them.
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One of the first of its kind in Central Asia, this study by Moscow's Migration Research Centre assesses the needs and priorities of Central Asian and internal migrant domestic workers in Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia and Astana and Almaty, Kazakhstan. Its findings provide the basis for further work to improve the policies regulating domestic workers.